Education

Primary Schools

Primary school children respond to approachable, attractive washroom design. Ask pupils what they wanted  and they clearly demonstrated their priorities of privacy, hygiene, and the creation of a clean, bright and colourful environment, stocked with the essentials we all need, like soft toilet paper, soap and hand drying facilities   Door heights can be selected to reflect the age range of the children giving them privacy whilst still allowing for adult supervision to prevent anti-social behaviour and bullying.

We suggest the following door heights: Infants (4-7 years) – 1200mm, Key Stage 1 (5-7 years) – 1350mm & Key Stage 2 (7-11 years) 1500mm (All door heights are from the floor to the top of the door)

Hillsborough School Penguin

We recommend the use of Solid Grade Laminate in these washrooms for its durability and resistance to vandalism.  Children appreciate bright colours and bold designs.  We can colour co-ordinate fittings to contrast or match the cubicles.

Legislation and Standards

Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999 for local authority maintained schools.

Part 5 of The Education (Independent Schools Standards) Regulations 2010 for independent schools.

Good practice ideas are available from here

Secondary School

wisbech-grammar little-heath


Washroom design for this age group needs to be contemporary and yet engender respect from the majority of children whilst withstanding the abuses of the few who do not.  The design should reduce the institutional feel of the toilets while encouraging feelings of ownership.  Door heights are normally 2000mm to the top of the door in same sex washrooms.  However, we frequently supply full height doors and partitions for unisex washrooms to provide complete privacy for this emotionally challenging time of their lives.  It is worth considering urinal modesty screens for the male washrooms. All other areas of the washroom should be as open as possible to allow for discreet adult supervision. Younger children prefer bright colours and patterns while adolescents prefer more sophisticated, subdued colours.

We recommend the use of Solid Grade Laminate which is waterproof and robust anti-vandal fittings and tamper-proof access panels behind toilets and under vanity units.

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Higher Education

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University and College washrooms need to be robust enough to withstand heavy use and intensive cleaning yet be pleasant to use and encourage an appreciation of the facilities, thereby reducing vandalism. Design considerations should include the washroom being bright, welcoming, clean and hygienic, encourage respect and discourage damage caused by a minority of users.

We recommend the use of Solid Grade Laminate which is waterproof and hygienic, robust anti-vandal fittings and tamper-proof access panels behind toilets and under vanity units. This provides a streamlined area with no unsightly pipework encouraging bacteria to grow.

Legislation and Standards

Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999 for local authority maintained colleges.

Part 5 of The Education (Independent Schools Standards) Regulations 2010 for independent schools.

Good practice ideas are available from here

Part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination in the provision of education. The original and fundamental duties in DDA Part 4 state that disabled people cannot, without justification, be discriminated against or receive less favourable treatment for a reason related to their disability and that educational institutions must make ‘reasonable adjustments’. These duties are ‘anticipatory’, hence education institutions need to look ahead to provide the necessary adjustments which disabled people are likely to require.  Please see the Code of Practice (revised) for providers of post 16 education

Take a look at the ranges suitable for the Education sector: